Glass Options for Enhanced Building Design

Sponsored by Pilkington North America

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the different types of high-performance glass that are available and explain how these products impact occupant health, safety, and sustainability.
  2. Investigate the design potential and innovative opportunities to reduce bird strikes, improve sound attenuation, reduce fire risk, and improve surface cleanliness using advanced glass technologies.
  3. Explain how window retrofit technologies and power generating/dynamic glazing contribute to green and sustainable design in buildings.
  4. Acquire insights into emerging technologies being used to achieve healthier, safer, and more sustainable buildings, beyond achieving performance and aesthetic targets.

Credits:

HSW
1 AIA LU/HSW
IDCEC
1 IDCEC CEU
IACET
0.1 IACET CEU*
AIBD
1 AIBD P-CE
AAA
AAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
AANB
This course can be self-reported to the AANB, as per their CE Guidelines
AAPEI
AAPEI 1 Structured Learning Hour
MAA
MAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
NLAA
This course can be self-reported to the NLAA.
NSAA
This course can be self-reported to the NSAA
NWTAA
NWTAA 1 Structured Learning Hour
OAA
OAA 1 Learning Hour
SAA
SAA 1 Hour of Core Learning
 
This course can be self-reported to the AIBC, as per their CE Guidelines.
This course is approved as a Structured Course
This course can be self-reported to the AANB, as per their CE Guidelines
Approved for structured learning
Approved for Core Learning
This course can be self-reported to the NLAA
Course may qualify for Learning Hours with NWTAA
Course eligible for OAA Learning Hours
This course is approved as a core course
This course can be self-reported for Learning Units to the Architectural Institute of British Columbia

Different buildings have differing needs for aesthetics, performance, and functional operations. Few building materials have as great an impact on all three of these areas as glass since it plays a unique and important role in building design and the environment. The use of glass in buildings affects design, appearance, thermal performance, and occupant comfort. Historically, glass was used mainly for windows to admit air and light, but with advanced manufacturing options and the need for high performance buildings, it is now integral to interior and exterior architecture. Glass now plays a critical role in achieving a wide variety of dynamic and varied performance requirements from reducing bird strikes to generating power. These evolving technologies enable a variety of occupant and building performance improvements such as air quality improvements, fire protection, and improved acoustic performance. Additionally, these technologies can be used to enable significant reductions in the energy usage of existing and new buildings, which further improves sustainability and the push towards zero net carbon building future. Therefore, the selection of the right types of glass is a crucial element of the design process to create solutions that not just achieve the performance and aesthetic targets, but also directly lead to the greater goals of occupant health and comfort as well achieving the macroscale building demands in terms of sustainability and operations. Architects who understand the full range of possibilities available from glass manufacturers can use them to design the aesthetics, performance, and wellness standards required of the built environment today.

Glass Options

Photo © Ben Rahn/A-Frame

 

Pilkington North America – NSG Group The flat glass business of the NSG Group, operating under the Pilkington brand, is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of glass and glazing products for the building and automotive markets, with manufacturing operations in 29 countries on four continents and sales in 130 countries.

 

Originally published in September 2022

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